Post(s) tagged with "stars"

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Starry Sky, Washington Photograph by Rhys Logan, My ShotDriving home over the Waterville Plateau, a waxing sliver of a moon that fell early below the horizon made for a perfect moment of stargazing. What was even more eerie though, was that the wind had completely stopped also. Even from about 30 feet up a small embankment I could hear my shutter trip for a 25-second exposure. The lights on the horizon, shining from over 70 miles away, were the city lights of Ephrata and Moses Lake, Washington.
Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

There’s a motorcycle park about 15 minutes away that I go to to stargaze. It’s not as dark as I would like it but it does quite well for the time being (the lower western sky is filled with light pollution). I’m still searching for a place nearby that has really dark skies so I can work on taking photos like this.
On a related note, I really like Moses Lake.

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Starry Sky, Washington
Photograph by Rhys Logan, My Shot
Driving home over the Waterville Plateau, a waxing sliver of a moon that fell early below the horizon made for a perfect moment of stargazing. What was even more eerie though, was that the wind had completely stopped also. Even from about 30 feet up a small embankment I could hear my shutter trip for a 25-second exposure. The lights on the horizon, shining from over 70 miles away, were the city lights of Ephrata and Moses Lake, Washington.

Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

There’s a motorcycle park about 15 minutes away that I go to to stargaze. It’s not as dark as I would like it but it does quite well for the time being (the lower western sky is filled with light pollution). I’m still searching for a place nearby that has really dark skies so I can work on taking photos like this.

On a related note, I really like Moses Lake.


23 September 2010 @ 00:30 402 nationalgeographicmagazine
itsfullofstars:

Zodiacal Light Over NamibiaCredit & Copyright: Rudi Dobesberger (Sternfreunde Steyr)
Explanation: An unusual triangle of light is visible this time of year just before dawn, in the northern hemisphere. Once considered a false dawn, this triangle of light is actually zodiacal light, light reflected from interplanetary dust particles. The bright reflecting triangle is clearly visible on the right of the above horizontally-compressed image taken just after sunset from Namibia in the southern hemisphere in 2009 June. The central band of our Milky Way Galaxy on the left first mirrors the zodiacal band on the right but then curves around the sky. The faint smudges inside the arch of the Milky Way are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Zodiacal dust orbits the Sun predominantly in the same plane as the planets: the ecliptic. Zodiacal light is so bright in the north this time of year because the dust band is oriented nearly vertical at sunrise, so that the thick air near the horizon does not block out relatively bright reflecting dust. Zodiacal light is also bright for people in Earth’s northern hemisphere in March and April just after sunset. In the southern hemisphere, zodiacal light is most notable after sunset in late summer, and brightest before sunrise in late spring.

itsfullofstars:

Zodiacal Light Over Namibia
Credit & Copyright: Rudi Dobesberger (Sternfreunde Steyr)

Explanation: An unusual triangle of light is visible this time of year just before dawn, in the northern hemisphere. Once considered a false dawn, this triangle of light is actually zodiacal light, light reflected from interplanetary dust particles. The bright reflecting triangle is clearly visible on the right of the above horizontally-compressed image taken just after sunset from Namibia in the southern hemisphere in 2009 June. The central band of our Milky Way Galaxy on the left first mirrors the zodiacal band on the right but then curves around the sky. The faint smudges inside the arch of the Milky Way are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Zodiacal dust orbits the Sun predominantly in the same plane as the planets: the eclipticZodiacal light is so bright in the north this time of year because the dust band is oriented nearly vertical at sunrise, so that the thick air near the horizon does not block out relatively bright reflecting dust. Zodiacal light is also bright for people in Earth’s northern hemisphere in March and April just after sunset. In the southern hemisphere, zodiacal light is most notable after sunset in late summer, and brightest before sunrise in late spring.


18 September 2010 @ 06:30 254 itsfullofstars
fuckyeahspace:

:’(
(via lowbright, reddit)

fuckyeahspace:

:’(

(via lowbrightreddit)


27 August 2010 @ 08:00 1093 spaceinperspective
remmbermytitans:

itsfullofstars:

A Milky Way Shadow at Loch Ard Gorge Credit & Copyright: Alex Cherney (Terrastro)
Explanation: Have you ever seen the Milky Way’s glow create shadows? To do so, conditions need to be just right. First and foremost, the sky must be relatively clear of clouds so that the long band of the Milky Way’s central disk can be seen. The surroundings must be very near to completely dark, with no bright artificial lights visible anywhere. Next, the Moon cannot be anywhere above the horizon, or its glow will dominate the landscape. Last, the shadows can best be caught on long camera exposures. In the above image taken in Port Campbell National Park, Victoria, Australia, seven 15-second images of the ground and de-rotated sky were digitally added to bring up the needed light and detail. In the foreground lies Loch Ard Gorge, named after a ship that tragically ran aground in 1878. The two rocks pictured are the remnants of a collapsed arch and are named Tom and Eva after the only two people who survived that Loch Ard ship wreck. A close inspection of the water just before the rocks will show shadows in light thrown by our Milky Way galaxy. Low clouds are visible moving through the serene scene in this movie.
(via APOD)

So, wait, is it not possible to see this without a camera?

You can see the Milky Way in the night sky, it’s a lighter patch along the sky (Literally looks like spilled Milk across the sky). But to have this type of depth and detail with the dust clouds, you cannot see with the naked eye. 

remmbermytitans:

itsfullofstars:

A Milky Way Shadow at Loch Ard Gorge 
Credit & Copyright: Alex Cherney (Terrastro)

Explanation: Have you ever seen the Milky Way’s glow create shadows? To do so, conditions need to be just right. First and foremost, the sky must be relatively clear of clouds so that the long band of the Milky Way’s central disk can be seen. The surroundings must be very near to completely dark, with no bright artificial lights visible anywhere. Next, the Moon cannot be anywhere above the horizon, or its glow will dominate the landscape. Last, the shadows can best be caught on long camera exposures. In the above image taken in Port Campbell National ParkVictoriaAustralia, seven 15-second images of the ground and de-rotated sky were digitally added to bring up the needed light and detail. In the foreground lies Loch Ard Gorge, named after a ship that tragically ran aground in 1878. The two rocks pictured are the remnants of a collapsed arch and are named Tom and Eva after the only two people who survived that Loch Ard ship wreck. A close inspection of the water just before the rocks will show shadows in light thrown by our Milky Way galaxy. Low clouds are visible moving through the serene scene in this movie.

(via APOD)

So, wait, is it not possible to see this without a camera?

You can see the Milky Way in the night sky, it’s a lighter patch along the sky (Literally looks like spilled Milk across the sky). But to have this type of depth and detail with the dust clouds, you cannot see with the naked eye. 


24 August 2010 @ 15:15 2501 remmbermytitans | Source: itsfullofstars
popcultaddict:

slutgarden:

(via -bears)

popcultaddict:

slutgarden:

(via -bears)


18 July 2010 @ 11:49 2410 wildandwild | Source: narcosis

11 July 2010 @ 02:35 3
thewarpedpassage:

kaleidoscopicmind:

flywithsuanay:

saamanthakayyy:

himynameiscarl:habitababatabiyabbadabbadoo:


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things that freak me out reblog

thewarpedpassage:

kaleidoscopicmind:

flywithsuanay:

saamanthakayyy:

himynameiscarl:habitababatabiyabbadabbadoo:

(via hatsumiyo)

things that freak me out reblog


20 June 2010 @ 09:52

ABOUT
WEDGE ANTILLES

Scribblings from an X-Wing in a galaxy far, far away.

Hello, my name is Rebecca. I'm an above average Star Wars fan. I have a deep appreciation for Wedge Antilles and the rest of the X-Wing pilots (most specifically Rogue and Wraith Squadrons). I, also, lead a Corran Horn appreciation life.

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